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      Preventing Student Suicide with Just a Few Simple Questions      Suicide among children and teens   is shockingly on the rise. In the wake of each tragedy, parents, peers, and educators are filled with devastation and regret. Spending so much time with children, teachers often feel guilty that they didn’t realize their student was suicidal. Other times, they sensed something was wrong but weren’t sure how to effectively intervene. So how can teachers determine if their students are at risk for suicide, and what can they do about it?    Learning these simple steps could help you save a student’s life:    1. Separate suicide and NSSI   One of the obstacles in providing proper interventions is educators not grasping the difference between suicidal behavior and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Both are serious and require intervention, but the response for suicidality is different than for NSSI. Properly identifying a student’s behaviors is an important first step in getting them the right help. A few key characteristics of the two include:   Suicidal behavior/ideation:     The person has some   intention of dying       They know that their   behavior could result in death      May   seek the most painless way   to do it     NSSI:     Has   no intention   of dying      Does not believe   their actions could result in death      Seeks physical pain   to escape emotional pain    NSSI has   3 possible functions:      To   obtain relief     from a negative feeling or cognitive state e.g. stress, worry thoughts, loneliness, emptiness    To   resolve     interpersonal conflict e.g. family arguments, divorce, sibling rivalry, peer conflict    To   induce   a positive feeling state e.g. euphoria, decrease numbness       For an in-depth look at NSSI and what to do about it,    click here     2. Explore the C-SSRS   The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) was developed to provide a simple, accurate, and effective tool that anyone can use to evaluate risk for suicide. You do not need to be a mental health professional to administer it; all it requires is asking a series of simple questions and referring them to mental health services if their answers raise any red flags.    The full C-SSRS screening tool is available in several versions.   Below are a few quick links to commonly used versions.      Click here to access all versions of the C-SSRS.           C-SSRS for Teachers           C-SSRS for Family and Friends           C-SSRS for Teens to Talk to Friends           C-SSRS for Parents      3. Identify ideation   The first step in applying the C-SSRS is identifying ideation. If you are concerned your student may be at risk for suicide, start by asking these 2 questions:    “Have you wished you were dead or wished you could go to sleep and not wake up?”    “Have you actually had any thoughts of making yourself not alive anymore?”     4. Ask more as needed   When administering the C-SSRS, you only need to ask as many questions as it takes to determine whether your student has had suicidal ideation or behaviors. If your student answered no to both ideation questions, you can rule out ideation and jump right into the behavior questions listed in our next point. If they answered yes to either or both ideation questions, ask a few more ideation questions to gain understanding:    “Have you been thinking about how you might do this?”    “Have you had these thoughts and had some intention of acting on them?”    “Have you started to work out or worked out the details of how to kill yourself? Do you intend to carry out this plan?”     5. Assess for behaviors    Whether or not your student has indicated ideation, you must also ask behavioral questions. Determine whether they’ve engaged in suicidal behaviors by asking the following questions:    “Have you made a suicide attempt?”    “Have you done anything to harm yourself?”    “Have you done anything dangerous to where you could have died?”     6. Inquire about interruptions   Next, ask your student if there were ever times where they had attempts that were either stopped by someone interrupting them, or by them having second thoughts:    “Has there been a time when you started to do something to end your life but someone or something stopped you before you actually did anything?”    “Has there been a time when you started to do something to end your life but you stopped yourself before you actually did anything?”     7. Ask about preparatory behaviors   Even if your student has not indicated making any attempts, it’s important to find out if they’ve done anything to prepare to end their life. Examples could include collecting pills, purchasing a gun, writing a suicide note, or giving valuables away.      “Have you taken any steps toward making a suicide attempt or preparing to kill yourself?”     8. Know when it’s an emergency   If your student answers yes to any questions regarding ideation, behaviors, or non-suicidal self-injury, it’s important to refer them to mental health resources. For a student to require a 911 call and/or immediate escort to emergency services, they should meet either of the following criteria:    Active suicidal ideation with some intent to act, without specific plan    Active suicidal ideation with specific plan and intent     Check out these video clips to learn how to ask C-SSRS questions:    Joanna’s example       </iframe>" data-provider-name=""        Gabriel’s example       </iframe>" data-provider-name=""        Andrea’s example       </iframe>" data-provider-name=""          Click here to watch Columbia University’s C-SSRS webinar      9. Reach out and speak up   If your student’s answers have indicated suicidal ideation, suicidal behaviors, or non-suicidal self-injury, quickly share your findings with the school leadership, crisis response team, school psychologist, school counselor or other mental health professional on campus. If you’re not sure who to alert, call 911. As a preventative measure, advocate for mental health programming to be offered on campus so that all students learn healthy coping skills and become aware of available resources.    10. Host a C-SSRS training   The best way to prevent tragedy on campus is to get your faculty on the same page with effective tools that address mental health emergencies. While you don’t have to be a mental health professional to administer the C-SSRS, it’s best to complete a brief online training and receive additional in-person education from a mental health professional to fully grasp how to evaluate student answers in real-life scenarios.      Here is a listing of C-SSRS training options      including pre-recorded and live webinars.    If you represent a private school or district that would like to do an in-service teacher training, our Specialists can:    Visit your campus for in-person training    Answer questions and review key concepts of applying the C-SSRS    Provide realistic examples of evaluating students’ risk for self-harm    Help teachers prepare students for educational units or aspects of popular culture that may romanticize suicide (example:  Romeo and Juliet,  TV shoes depicting suicide, etc.)       


   
     
      
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      Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D.,  is an expert in Child and Educational psychology and is experienced in training educators on use of the C-SSRS screening tool.      
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
       Dr. Christopher J. Sample, Psy.D.  specializes in supporting men and teen boys through life’s transitions. If your teenage son is struggling with depression or is concerned for a friend, Dr. Sample can help.         
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Sample 
       Dr. Elsa Torres, Psy.D.,  is a specialist in Diagnostic Testing and Counseling. If you or someone you love has had thoughts of suicide, don’t put off seeking help. Dr. Torres can provide a safe place to listen and provide support.      
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Torres 
       Subscribe to our blog for a weekly article on topics that affect your life         
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams, graduate and professional licensing exams such as MCAT, LSAT, GRE, CBEST, NCLEX, GMAT, CA Cosmetology Exam, CA Contractors State Licensing Exam, and CA Bar Exam).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2018). The Columbia Protocol for Your Setting.  The Columbia Protocol for Communities and Healthcare.  Retrieved from http://cssrs.columbia.edu/the-columbia-scale-c-ssrs/cssrs-for-communities-and-healthcare/#filter=.general-use.english  The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2018). Community Card for Teachers.  The Columbia Protocol for Communities and Healthcare.  Retrieved from http://cssrs.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/Community-Card-Teachers-2018c.pdf  The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2018). Community Card for Friends and Family.  The Columbia Protocol for Communities and Healthcare.  Retrieved from http://cssrs.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/Community-Card-2women-2018c.pdf  The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2018). Community Card for Teens.  The Columbia Protocol for Communities and Healthcare.  Retrieved from http://cssrs.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/Community-Card-Teens-2018c.pdf  The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2018). Community Card for Parents.  The Columbia Protocol for Communities and Healthcare.  Retrieved from http://cssrs.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/Community-Card-Parents-2018c.pdf  The Columbia Lighthouse Project (2017).  C-SSRS Training . [Video webinar]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epTDFFv3uwc&list=PLZ6DpvOfzN1kV1F_lDw9-26JifBSDlIbF&index=2&app=desktop  Shinn, M.M. (2018). Cutting & Other Self-Harm: What Every Parent Needs to Know.  Psychologically Speaking . [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from  https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/cutting-other-self-harm-what-every-parent-needs-to-know    Shinn, M.M. (2018). 8 Tips to Create a Mentally Healthy Classroom.   Psychologically Speaking . [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from  https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/8-tips-to-create-a-mentally-healthy-classroom   Shinn. M.M. (2019). Parent’s Guide: What to do When Your Child’s Friend Dies by Suicide.  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from  https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/parents-guide-what-to-do-when-your-childs-friend-dies-by-suicide    Shinn. M.M. (2019). Suicide Prevention in the School Setting.  Variations Psychology, Futures Academy.  [Webinar].   Posner, K.; Brent, D.; Lucas, C.; Gould, M.; Stanley, B.; Brown, G.; Fisher, P.; Zelazny, J.; Burke, A.; Oquendo, M.; Mann, J.(2008) Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). The Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. Retrieved from https://cssrs.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/C-SSRS_Pediatric-SLC_11.14.16.pdf    How to Cite This Blog Article:    Shinn. M.M. (2019). Preventing Suicide in Students: How 3-6 Questions Can Save Lives.  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from: https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/preventing-student-suicide-with-just-a-few-simple-questions

Preventing Student Suicide with Just a Few Simple Questions

We’ve all been pained by recent news stories of teens and even young children dying by suicide. This week’s blog delves into how teachers can save lives with 3-6 simple questions.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The Guy’s Guide to Life After Divorce   Movies often portray divorced guys living it up and enjoying the freedom they’ve always wanted. In reality, this stereotype can be far from the truth. Men often experience the most devastating losses from divorce, often without knowing healthy ways to cope. Men are nearly twice as likely to develop major depression after divorce than women, and the suicide rate of divorced men is nearly twice that of married men. Society’s stigma on men seeking mental health help only worsens this concerning problem.    So with men often losing their children, friends, reputations, and homes after divorce, is there anything they can do to feel like themselves again?    If you are a man going through a divorce, give these tips a try:    1. Reorganize your life   During your divorce, your role as provider, father, husband, and protector will either feel lost or significantly changed. These losses feel devastating and can really make you question your purpose in life. Dealing with these changes starts with being able to reorganize your life around your new situation. Rethink relationships with friends, family, children, and your ex to fill your time wisely and meet your physical, mental, and social needs. Men that fail to take these steps are subject to prolonged depression, grief, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts.     Example:   “I’ve lost everything I’ve worked so hard for - my house is gone and I’m going from seeing my kids every day to every other weekend.”   Reorganized perspective:  “I’ll be getting more time to go out with the guys or just relax at home and do whatever I want. Every time I’m with the kids it’ll be more meaningful because we won’t see each other every day. Yeah, I’m moving into a smaller place but I finally get to listen to music as loud as I want and put what I like on the walls.”   2. Don’t set to self-destruct   Divorce can inflict a tremendous amount of pain that can cause men to try to escape what they are feeling. This puts them at risk to cope with self-destructive behaviors. Have fun and seek some thrills, but avoid resorting to damaging behaviors to numb emotional pain. Heavy drinking, drug abuse, or unsafe sex might temporarily boost your ego, but those highs are short-lived and will delay your process of moving on. Instead, get your adrenaline pumping with a new extreme sport or reigniting a hobby you gave up on years ago.     3. Stay Social   Men only initiate 1/3 of divorces.; this means that many men are forced to adjust to the idea of living alone after already being stripped of their role as head of household. Some men aren’t very social to begin with, so when their wife and kids leave they’re left with no social outlets. This isolation spirals many men into depression, so it’s important to surround yourself with a network of friends that you feel comfortable being yourself with.  Start a weekend poker night, join a fantasy football league, or plan a road trip with the guys.      4. Don’t dwell on the past   Men often get the short end of the stick with divorce with more financial obligations and less time with their kids. While these changes can be difficult, try not to dwell on what you’ve lost. Dwelling does not solve anything; much like running on a treadmill, you may think you’re going forward by rethinking the same thoughts, but you’re not.  However, processing and truly grieving what has been lost is the healthy way through a divorce. A    Specialist in Men’s Issues    can help you learn healthy ways to navigate your grieving process.      5. Keep a Forward Focus   Keep a forward focus by thinking of ways you can make the best of your current situation. Start a new tradition with your kids each time you see them. Enjoy doing things you could have never done while living with your ex – dust off the electric guitar and learn some new licks while cranking the amp up to 11, get online with your gaming system and some buddies and slay some newbs, carry out those old plans of creating a solid mancave. While you can’t control all that’s happening in your life, you do have the power to make the best of the hand you’ve been dealt.     6. Don’t ditch the doctor   Divorced men are more likely than married men to eat poorly, smoke more often, and die of preventable diseases. This is largely because spouses are more likely to push their husbands to stay on top of health screenings and preventative care. This can also be the result of men not doing the first recommended step – reorganizing their life around their new situation. Resist the tendency to let your physical health go once your spouse is out of the picture. When your body is healthy, your mind will be better equipped to move past the pain of divorce. Boost your mood with regular exercise, a well-balanced diet, dental screenings, annual physicals, and mental health support from a therapist or psychologist.      7. Date when you’re ready   Choosing when to get back in the dating scene is a personal choice. There’s no need to be in a rush to date after divorce, but going out and dating can be a great way to boost your confidence, feel attractive, and get out of a depressive slump. If you do decide to dive into the singles scene, use protection and steer clear of heavy, consistent drug or alcohol use. While there is certainly hope for another meaningful relationship in your future, take your time to grieve your marriage before jumping into another serious commitment.      8. Don’t pretend you’re fine when you’re not   If you are struggling with the mental and emotional impact of divorce, you are not alone. Seeking mental health support shows strength and courage, and can also provide you with the space to let out and process what you’ve been holding in. If you are experiencing any of the following warning signs of depression, don’t assume they’ll get better if you ignore them:      Anger, aggressiveness, or feeling on edge    Noticeable changes in energy and mood    Change in sleeping patterns    Trouble concentrating    Feelings of sadness and hopelessness    Suicidal thoughts    Feelings of worry and fear    Craving alcohol or drugs    Not enjoying pleasurable activities     Engaging in high-risk activities    Ongoing aches or digestive issues      Click here to read our blog on unmasking the 6 disguises of depression in men        9. Visit a Men’s Specialist   Divorce can feel earth-shattering to a man whose life and identity have revolved around his family. Moving past the losses that men experience in divorce is difficult, but adjusting to your new lifestyle can be much smoother with the support and guidance of a qualified men’s specialist.     Dr. Christopher J. Sample, Psy.D . specializes in supporting men and teenage boys through life’s transitions including the many obstacles faced during and after divorce. Dr. Sample provides a comfortable place for men in all walks of life to work through challenges and gain tools for leading successful and fulfilling lives.     
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with dr. sample 
       Subscribe to our blog for a weekly article on topics that affect your life          
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   Block, T. (2017). Divorce and MENtal Health. The Good Men Project. https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/divorce-and-mental-health-cmtt/  Bruce, M. L., & Kim, K. M. (1992). Differences in the effects of divorce on major depression in men and women.  The American Journal of Psychiatry, 149 (7), 914-917.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/ajp.149.7.914  Kposowa, A.J. (2000). Marital status and suicide in the National Longitudinal Mortality Study.  J Epidemiol Community Health ;54:254–261254   Menaghan, E., & Lieberman, M. (1986). Changes in Depression following Divorce: A Panel Study.  Journal of Marriage and Family,48 (2), 319-328. doi:10.2307/352399  Nauert, R. (2018) Men’s Mental Health Suffers After Divorce. PsychCentral. Retrieved online: https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/10/01/mens-mental-health-suffers-after-divorce/60153.html   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). The Guy’s Guide to Life After Divorce.   Psychologically Speaking .   [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-guys-guide-to-life-after-divorce

The Guy’s Guide to Life After Divorce

When a man goes through a divorce, he not only loses his spouse, but he often loses his children, friends, reputation, and home. Life after divorce can feel earth-shattering, but there are ways for men to work through their grief and find acceptance. Check out this week’s blog on The Guy’s Guide to Life After Divorce.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The Women’s Guide to Divorce: How to Work Toward Acceptance and Happiness    Divorce is something no woman thinks will ever happen to her. I mean come on - all of our childhood movies ended with a royal couple riding off to the magical land of “happily ever after.” We never had The Princess and the Prenup or Ariel’s Alimony Adventure – we were shown that you find your soulmate, exchange some rings, and it’s all sunshine from there. So what happens when a woman’s lifelong view of marriage comes crashing down into the harsh reality of divorce?  The answer is that the emotional impact can feel devastating, and often makes a woman question her identity and self-worth. If you’re a woman struggling through divorce - there is hope. Try these tips to work toward a happy, accepting future:   1. Write a goodbye letter   The grief experienced during divorce can rival that of having a loved one pass away. Not only are you mourning the loss of your relationship, but you’re mourning the vision you had for your life story. Write a letter saying goodbye to each of the dreams and experiences that you expected out of your marriage. This will help you define exactly what you are grieving so that you can work toward acceptance.   2. Write a hello letter   Divorce is a beginning as well as an end. After you write your goodbye letter, write another letter saying hello to all of the things that you would never experience if you were still with your ex. Hello ballroom dancing lessons. Hello wine tasting trips with the girls. Hello rights to the remote control. Hello flirting with that ridiculously attractive cashier. Though nothing will eliminate the pain and process of grieving your losses, focusing on new hobbies and fun activities can add a silver lining in this difficult time.   3. Redefine your identity    Women often view themselves in terms of their caregiving roles to others. If most of your identity is wrapped up in being someone’s spouse, divorce can really throw a wrench in your self-worth. When you are feeling depressed or that you’ve failed, spend time thinking about your talents, character traits, and values that make you who you are. Remind yourself that divorce does not define who you are as an individual.   4. Find a supportive circle   Friendships can be a little tricky after divorce since many married couples hang out with other couples. When one duo splits up, it’s common for mutual friends to keep their distance, adding to the pain and isolation divorce can bring. The good news is, divorce can be a great catalyst to make new friends who understand what you’re going through. There are lots of online and in-person support groups for divorced women to discuss experiences and share coping techniques. Also, this can be a great opportunity to reconnect with family members or friends that you didn’t have as much time for during your marriage.   5. Take a break from social media    Resist the urge to cyber-stalk your ex. There’s no need to see the petty, “I’m doing great,” posts – they’ll just irritate you. It’s common for women to worry about what their ex and other people are thinking and saying about their divorce; to help avoid this, consider taking a break from social media for at least a few weeks to focus your mind on yourself and not the rest of the world.    For more tips to avoid comparing yourself to social media, click here      6. If you have kids, model emotional intelligence    While emotional intelligence is important for everyone, it is especially important if you have children and are helping them work through your divorce. Emotional intelligence is being able to identify and process your emotions in a healthy way. If you have kids, they might have a hard time expressing their feelings, but you have the power to show them how to acknowledge and work through the difficult emotions divorce brings.  Example: “This is a difficult time for our family. I have been feeling confused and lonely sometimes, but I know that these feelings are temporary. We are a strong family and we will get through this together.”    For more tips on fostering emotional intelligence in your children, click here      7. Work toward acceptance    While it’s healthy to be aware of all of the emotions that you experience through divorce, remember that your end-goal is to accept your divorce and move on with your life. Try not to wallow in feelings of bitterness and resentment – when they arise, acknowledge them, but remember that you will be happier once you can learn to move past them.   8. Keep your heels on the high ground    Taking the moral high ground in divorce can be tough, especially if your ex is petty-posting pics with their new love interest or writing derogatory tweets about you. No matter how awful your ex is being, remind yourself that no good will come from you retaliating. If you’re a mom, don’t badmouth your ex to your kids or try to make them spies. Don’t attempt to get your ex fired or ruin their friendships. As hard as it may be, keeping civil is best for your long-term mental health.   9. See a specialist    Divorce can be one of the most difficult experiences a woman may face, challenging her identity, self-esteem, and emotional health. Many times, friends and family just don’t seem to get it and women can feel alone in their despair. Fortunately, there are many resources for women going through divorce and there’s no reason to go through it alone.   Dr. Daniella A. Davis, Psy.D. , is an expert in dealing with the unique challenges that women face throughout each stage of life. If you are a woman struggling through the challenges of divorce or marital issues, Dr. Davis can provide support, understanding, and practical tips to get back to living your best life.     
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Davis 
       Cynthia Johnson, LMFT,  is a specialist in Parenting and Child Therapy at Variations Psychology. She has years of experience in helping parents, teens, and children work through family issues and overcome challenges brought on by divorce. If you are worried that divorce or marital issues are harming your family’s emotional health, Cynthia can help.   Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D. , is an expert in child and educational psychology. Divorce can impact a child’s school performance, cause them to act out, or result in anxiety and depression. If you are worried about the impact of divorce on your children, Dr. Shinn can provide evaluations, therapy, and educational consulting to ensure your child has support they need to overcome challenges and succeed.     
 
	  Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
       Subscribe to our blog for a weekly article on topics that affect your life         
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   https://www.webmd.com/sex-relationships/features/life-after-divorce-3-survival-strategies#3  https://helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm  https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/03/divorce-stress-_n_4175767.html  https://www.womansday.com/relationships/dating-marriage/advice/a6834/divorce-advice-women/  https://www.womanpulse.com/coping-dealing-divorce-guide/  http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/separation-and-divorce  https://www.womansdivorce.com/positive-side-of-divorce.html   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). The Women’s Guide to Divorce: How to Work Toward Acceptance and Happiness.    Psychologically Speaking .  [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-womens-guide-to-divorce-how-to-work-toward-acceptance-and-happiness

The Women’s Guide to Divorce:
How to Work Toward Acceptance and Happiness

Divorce is something no woman thinks will ever happen to her. I mean come on - all of our childhood movies ended with a royal couple riding off to the magical land of “happily ever after.” We never had The Princess and the Prenup or Ariel’s Alimony Adventure – we were shown that you find your soulmate, exchange some rings, and it’s all sunshine from there. So what happens when a woman’s lifelong view of marriage comes crashing down into the harsh reality of divorce?