PRIDE

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The Teacher’s TCIT Toolkit    Children yearn to feel understood but it’s challenging for teachers to build relationships with students who talk back, distract other kids, and refuse to comply with instructions. But what if there was a way to change the dynamic between teachers and disruptive kids? What if there was a method to get these students engaged in lessons, behaving calmly, and complying with commands? Though this may sound like a fairy tale, a behavioral intervention called Teacher Child Interaction Training (TCIT) may be able to make this dream a reality in your classroom.    So what can you do to apply TCIT with your students?       1. Know the need     10 to 22% of students struggle with behavioral issues or psychological disorders, and teachers often feel ill-equipped to support these students’ needs. With the expectation of meeting every students’ unique needs, it’s only natural for teachers to feel frustrated with kids who act out. This begins a vicious cycle of a child acting disruptively, a teacher responding with negative attention, and a classroom missing out on opportunities to learn. With TCIT however, teachers can increase desirable behaviors and create a positive classroom environment.     2. Discover the benefits       Research on TCIT has shown it as an effective way to:      Increase job satisfaction in educators    Reduce disruptive behaviors in students    Improve interactions between children and teachers    Improve students’ emotional intelligence and academic performance    Increase students’ compliance and self-regulation    Decrease teachers’ need to issue commands     TCIT benefits children with a variety of conditions that can be challenging for teachers to support including:    Oppositional Defiant Disorder    Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder    Conduct Disorder    Child Maltreatment & Trauma    Bipolar Disorder    Anxiety & Depressive Disorders     3. Apply the principles      Families around the world have discovered the benefits of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an intervention that teaches parents how to increase positive experiences with their children. The principles of PCIT improve a child’s compliance by:    Providing clear and consistent expectations for their behavior    Increasing positive attention toward children     Using selective attention by ignoring minor unwanted behaviors    Reducing criticisms and questions    TCIT embraces these principles while adapting techniques to the classroom setting.   4. Educate with PRIDE      TCIT identifies 5 core skills that teachers can use to improve teacher-student relationships. By giving students opportunities to lead activities and incorporating these skills while observing them, teachers can reinforce positive behaviors in students:      PRAISE   – Label the behaviors you appreciate in your students, praising them for acting appropriately.     Younger Child Example : “I love how Marta is using her pencil.”   Older Child Example:  “Thank you for being in your seat before the bell.”     REFLECTION   – Reflect back on things your students say to show that you are listening and appreciate their thoughts.     Younger Child Example :  Student:  “I wrote a story about a superhero who gets his powers from lima beans.”  Teacher:  “You wrote a superhero story!”    Older Child Example:   Student:  “I coded this entire webpage!”   Teacher:  “Coding is your thing!”     IMITATION   – Boost your student’s confidence by copying their creations or ideas. Imitation shows children that you enjoy interacting with them and think their ideas are valuable and interesting.     Younger Child Example : “I’m going to paint an animal picture just like Lola.”   Older Child Example:  “I like how you explained that formula, I am going to explain it that way to the other students.”      DESCRIPTION   – Support your students’ language development and communication skills by describing what you see them doing.     Younger Child Example : “I see you’re carefully gluing each piece of your project together.”   Older Child Example:  “I see you’re writing everything in your planner.”     ENJOYMENT   – Express enthusiasm and enjoyment as you interact with your class. The more fun you are having, the more engaged your students will be.     Younger Child Example : “I’m having so much fun practicing for our spring recital!”    Older Child Example:  “I really enjoy going to competitions with our team!”    Click to download our free PRIDE Skills for Teachers Form      
 
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       5. Point out the positive     A key element of TCIT is giving more attention to the positive than the negative. When teachers react to negative attention-seeking behaviors, students will continue to seek attention by acting out. When behaviors are only mildly disruptive, ignore them and look for the next opportunity to point out something positive the student does. Of course, there are times when behaviors can’t be ignored, which brings us to our next tips:     6. Set rules strategically     Establishing clear rules is essential for students to understand your expectations. Be strategic in setting rules that are:     Simple  – Rules should be easily understandable for your students’ age      Specific  – Gray areas leave room for students to argue or negotiate     Visible  – Display rules in a noticeable area     Enforceable  – “Respect yourself,” is a great goal to encourage students to have, but it’s too vague to enforce as a rule with consequences     7. Connect your consequences     Let’s say a child pushes a classmate during reading and you don’t allow them to participate in a trivia game two hours later. Your consequence might not make sense to them because they’ve moved on with their day and missing an academic game isn’t clearly connected to pushing. When a child doesn’t understand how a consequence relates to their behavior, they are more likely to break that rule again. A more effective consequence would be to have them sit away from other students until they can keep their hands to themselves. By immediately enforcing clear consequences, your students will be less likely to repeat the same mistakes moving forward.      8. Be a calm commander     The TCIT method calls for giving commands that are simple, calm, and direct. To ensure your instructions are TCIT approved, give commands that are:    Given one at a time    Explained in a calm, neutral tone      Stated after a reason ( Reason : “We are going outside for recess.”  Command : “When I call your table, please line up at the door.”)    Respectful and polite (Starting with, “please,” models good manners)    Specific (“Please stay in your seat.” “Please talk with your group quietly,” rather than, “please behave during group work.”)    Positively stated (“Please keep your feet on the ground” instead of, “stop putting your feet on your desk”)       


   
     
      
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      9. Is managing student behavior stressing you out?     Are you a teacher feeling stressed out with the demands of managing a classroom while meeting academic standards? Do you represent a district or private school and want to learn more about how to implement TCIT in your school? Reach out to us for a consultation and learn about our school-based coaching service to empower teachers with the TCIT model.    Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D.,  is an expert in child and educational psychology and a U.C. Davis TCIT & PCIT trainer. Dr. Shinn is experienced in empowering teachers and mental health professionals in understanding the TCIT method and incorporating its principles into their school’s culture.     


   
     
      
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams, graduate and professional licensing exams such as MCAT, LSAT, GRE, CBEST, NCLEX, GMAT, CA Cosmetology Exam, CA Contractors State Licensing Exam, and CA Bar Exam).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   Budd, K.S., Stern, D. (2016). About TCIT.  TCIT.org.  Retrieved online: http://www.tcit.org/home/about/  Budd, K.S., Stern, D. (2016). Educators.  TCIT.org.  Retrieved online: http://www.tcit.org/educators/  Dover, V., Murillo, M., Garcia, A., Curiel, C., & Vargas, L. (2008). University of California Davis. https://pcit.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/3_TCIT-Presentation-for-Conf.pdf  Giebel, S. (2018). E.C.M.H. Teacher-Child Interaction Therapy Model.  University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development.  Retrieved online: https://www.ocd.pitt.edu/ECMH-Teacher-Child-Interaction-Therapy-Model/354/Default.aspx  Linson, Michael (2015). How to Create the Perfect Set of Classroom Rules.  Smart Classroom Management.  Retrieved online: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2015/07/18/how-to-create-the-perfect-set-of-classroom-rules/  Lyon, A. R., Gershenson, R. A., Farahmand, F. K., Thaxter, P. J., Behling, S., & Budd, K. S. (2009). Effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) in a Preschool Setting.  Behavior Modification ,  33 (6), 855–884. https://doi.org/10.1177/0145445509344215  McIntosh, D.E., Rizza, M.G., Bliss, L. (2000). Implementing empirically supported interventions: Teacher-Child interaction therapy.  Psychology in the Schools.  Retrieved online: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/1520-6807(200009)37:5%3C453::AID-PITS5%3E3.0.CO;2-2  PCIT & TCIT Training (2018). PCITtraining.com. Retrieved online: https://pcit-training.com/tcit/what-is-teacher-child-interaction-training/  Urquiza, A., Zebell, N., Timmer, S., McGrath, J., & Whitten, L. (2011) Be Direct: Improving Compliance Giving Effective Commands .  Course of Treatment Manual for PCIT-TC.  Unpublished Manuscript. Retrieved online: https://pcit.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/48_BEDIRECTrevised.pdf  Watson, A. (2018). How to Create Class Rules.  The Cornerstone for Teachers.  Retrieved online: https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/class-rules/    How to Cite This Blog Article:    Shinn. M.M. (2019). The Teacher’s TCIT Toolkit  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from: https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-teachers-tcit-toolkit

The Teacher’s TCIT Toolkit

Calling all teachers!Do you feel at your wit’s end with disruptive kids?

Are you stressed with trying to support your students’ emotional health while meeting rising academic standards?

Teacher Child Interaction Therapy (TCIT) has been shown to reduce disruptive behaviors in students and improve relationships between kids and educators - all while improving job satisfaction for teachers! To learn 9 tips on bringing TCIT into your classroom, check out this week’s blog.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Get Moving! 10 Reasons to Engage Your Kids in Active Play     Today’s kids are spending more time indoors and less time riding bikes, scraping knees, and making mischief with friends. Many parents question whether it’s really a big deal if their kids spend hours in front of screens. However, our nation’s decrease in exercise is causing some serious damage to kids’ physical and mental health. With roughly 1 in 3 American kids being overweight, it’s critical that parents get their children moving. So why is active play so crucial for your child, and how can parents fit play into their busy lives?    Here are 10 reasons active play should be a top priority in your child’s life:     1. Academic potential skyrockets     Parents go to great lengths to enhance their children’s learning – springing for expensive tutors, brainy toys, or private school tuitions to give their kids the best opportunities. However, simply taking active breaks after every 3 hours of learning can give a serious boost to your child’s retention. Kids who are given a chance to be active have higher attention spans and are 20% more likely to get an A+ in math or English – now that’s something to get moving for!    For more tips on supporting children with learning and attention challenges, click here       Did you know that exercise reduces your child’s risk of behavioral problems? Active play has been associated with:      Reducing bullying by 43%    Dropping discipline referrals by 57%    Reducing depression and anxiety    Improving mood and self-esteem     Decreasing aggression      Have a defiant kid? Click here       3, You don’t have to get fancy     While many parents enroll their kids in structured sports like gymnastics or soccer, paying for more than a few activities can quickly drain your wallet and make you feel like a full-time chauffeur. The good news is, active play doesn’t require fancy equipment or formal training. Dancing around while dinner cooks, walking the dog, playing hopscotch, or chasing bubbles are just a few simple ways to get moving with your kids.      4. Active play is for everyone     Parents of children with special needs or learning differences may wonder if active play will contribute to hyperactivity. However, research shows physical activity has the opposite effect. Exercise has been shown to promote calm, focus, and structure in children. Allowing your kid to burn energy throughout the day will also improve their sleep – something all parents can appreciate     5. It supports them socially     When your child is allowed to play freely with friends, it naturally boosts their social skills and emotional intelligence. Play fosters friendships, gives opportunities for conflict resolution, teaches sharing, promotes emotional regulation, and provides children with a sense of belonging.     For more tips on boosting your child’s emotional intelligence, click here     6. Health benefits last a lifetime     Obesity is a serious health concern that increases a person’s risk for diabetes, stroke, hypertension, heart disease, gallbladder disease, cancer, sleep apnea, and death. Active play is one of the best ways to prevent these life-threatening conditions in your child. By engaging in regular exercise, your child will:      Develop strong bones, muscles, and joints    Be 41% less likely to become overweight    Be at reduced risk for chronic illnesses associated with obesity    Be sick less often and require fewer school nurse visits     7. You can be a great role model     Your children look up to you as an example of how active they should be. When parents lead an active lifestyle, physical play becomes second nature for their kids. This doesn’t mean you need to force yourself to be the next Serena Williams or Cristiano Ronaldo; if you don’t like doing structured workouts, find activities that are fun and make you forget you’re exercising such as nature hikes or swimming.        
 
	 read the research on family mealtime coaching (FMC) and active play 
       8. The 60/60 rule works     Experts recommend that kids get 2 hours of daily physical activity to get the most out of play – one hour of free, unstructured play, and another hour of adult-led play. However, life’s demands can make it hard for parents to play for a full hour at a time. Here are a few tips for getting your kid’s “play quota” in each week:      Enroll them in organized team sports – these are usually about an hour long    Advocate at their school district for daily PE of at least 30 minutes    Fit play into smaller segments throughout the day, taking 10-minute breaks to walk, run, or jump rope every few hours     Feel like taking a 3-minute active break right now? Grab your kids and “play in place” with this awesomely active song!        

 
 
    

 
 
      9. PRIDE promotes play     Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) identifies the following five techniques called PRIDE skills that parents can use to make play a positive and engaging experience:      P RAISE – Compliment your child for positive behaviors.     Example:  “Great job throwing the ball!”    R EFLECTION – Repeat back what your child tells you.     Example:  “You’re right, you got it in the basket!”    I MITATION – Copy what your child does to enforce positive behaviors.     Example:  “I’m going to do the same stretches you are doing.”     D ESCRIPTION – Describe what your child is doing to boost their language and communication skills.     Example:  “You’re hopping on your left foot!”    E NJOYMENT – Express fun and enthusiasm as you play with your child.     Example:  “This is so much fun! Come dance with me!”     Dads - check out our PRIDE of Fatherhood blog       10. A Specialist can help      Play has the power to boost your child’s intellectual, emotional, and physical development, but it can be hard for parents to know how to unlock that potential. A Play Specialist can empower you to connect with your child through play, improving their health and making the most out of physical activity.      


   
     
      
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      Dr. Daniella A. Davis, Psy.D. ,  is an expert in dealing with the unique challenges that women face throughout each stage of life. If you wish your family led a healthier lifestyle but don’t know where to start, Dr Davis can support you on a clear path toward reaching your goals.       
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Davis 
       Dr. Christopher J. Sample, Psy.D.  specializes in supporting teenage boys through life’s transitions. If you are looking for ways to help your teenage son develop a more active lifestyle, Dr. Sample can help.        
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Sample 
       Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D.,  is an expert in child and educational psychology. If you are concerned that a lack of active play has been impacting your child’s development, Dr. Shinn can provide diagnostic testing and recommend support for your child’s unique needs.      
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams, graduate and professional licensing exams such as MCAT, LSAT, GRE, CBEST, NCLEX, GMAT, CA Cosmetology Exam, CA Contractors State Licensing Exam, and CA Bar Exam).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). Childhood Obesity Facts. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). The Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/effects/index.html  Common Sense Media (2015). The Common Sense Census: Media Used by Tweens and Teens. Retrieved from: http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2017/images/11/07/commonsensecensus.mediausebytweensandteens.2015.final.pdf  Shinn. M.M. (2018). ADHD or Just Kids Being Kids?  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from:   https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/adhd-or-just-kids-being-kids    Shinn. M.M. (2018). 5 Tips for Raising Emotionally Intelligent Children.  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from:   https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/5-tips-for-raising-emotionally-intelligent-children     Shinn. M.M. (2019). My Kid is So Defiant – Is It My Fault?  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from:   https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/my-kid-is-so-defiant-is-it-my-fault     Shinn. M.M. (2018). The P.R.I.D.E. of Fatherhood.  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from:   https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-pride-of-fatherhood-5-ways-that-great-dads-shape-our-mental-health    Shinn, M.M., Turner, A., Taylor Lucas, C. (2016). Play in Place. Presentation.  Child Guidance Center, Children & Families Commission of Orange County, & UC Irvine .   Taylor Lucas, C. E., Shinn, M. M., & Turner, A. C., (2015). Play in place. Unpublished recording. Redondo Beach, California: Mike Irwin Studios  Turner, A. C., (2013). Active play every day: A manual for facilitating active play with young children. Unpublished manuscript.    How to Cite This Blog Article:    Shinn. M.M. (2019). Get Moving! 10 Reasons to Engage Your Kids in Active Play.  Psychologically Speaking.  [Variations Psychology blog post]. Retrieved from: https://www.variationspsychology.com/test-blog/get-moving-10-reasons-to-engage-your-kids-in-active-play

Get Moving! 10 Reasons to Engage Your Kids in Active Play

With childhood obesity being a serious health concern, it’s critical that parents make active play a daily priority for their kids. Check out this week’s blog for 10 ways that active play improves your child’s physical, mental, and emotional health.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The Parents Guide to Play: 9 Tips to Ignite Your Child’s Learning    Most parents dread this familiar scenario: you buy your kid a new toy, they’re thrilled for ten minutes, but then the toy sits on a shelf collecting dust for six months. While you can’t stop your child from shifting interests, you can engage them through play to support their learning, develop their social skills, and boost their creativity. But with hectic lives and daily distractions, it can be hard for parents to know how to channel their inner-child and connect with their kids through play.    So what can parents do to help their kids get the most out of playtime?    1. Accept the challenge   Play has always been a natural part of childhood across cultures, but today’s society doesn’t lend itself to children getting much unstructured play. Kids aren’t going outside as often, they’re involved in more structured activities, and many schools have reduced recess periods. Research has shown a correlation between society’s decrease in play and increases in depression and anxiety. For these reasons, it’s important that parents accept the challenge of consciously making play a priority.      2. Learn the benefits   Understanding the perks of playtime will help you make educated decisions about what types of toys and activities will benefit your child most. Play can help your child:      Learn about their world    Manage their feelings    Build relationships and social skills    Learn from playmates    Enhance their physical health     Discover how to self-entertain    Ignite their creativity     It’s also important to realize the damage that inactivity can cause – not getting adequate playtime can prevent your child’s brain from developing normally, increase attention issues, and negatively impact their academic performance.     3. Put quality before quantity   When it comes to playing with your kids, it’s important that you genuinely connect with them, even if only for 5 or 10 minutes at a time. If you’re sleep-deprived or stressed out like parents often are, take a break and catch up on bonding time later. Your child will benefit most from playing with you when you are rested, calm, and ready to have some fun.      4. Rotate playmates   It’s important for your child to play and interact with you as their parent, but also make sure they get ample playtime with peers their own age as well as some alone time to play by themselves. Playing with peers will help them develop social skills, and playing alone will help them learn to entertain themselves creatively.      5. Tailor toys by age   As your child’s brain develops, they will require different types of toys to stimulate their interests and learn new skills. Toys generally list which age groups they are geared toward, but you can also check out this    year-by-year toy guide      for details on which toys are best for your child in each stage of development.      6. Balance nurture with boundaries   Play provides a space for kids to lead and parents to learn what their kids are thinking and feeling. While play should be child-led, it also provides opportunities for parents to set limits and teach their children to respect boundaries. Empower your child by letting them choose and lead activities, but don’t allow them to behave in disrespectful or inappropriate ways. Playtime is a great opportunity to teach your child to consider the feelings of others – a lesson that will benefit them when playing with other kids at school.      7. Don’t Dominate   It’s great for you to become engaged in play, but make sure you don’t dominate activities yourself. Parents are especially prone to doing this with crafts or projects that are supposed to turn out a certain way, and can end up pushing their child aside as they create the finished product. So next time you’re creating a Lego masterpiece or building a robotic unicorn, make sure your kid is equally engaged in the assembly.      8. Practice PRIDE skills    Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) identifies 5 skills that parents can use to shape their children’s emotional and behavioral well-being. Incorporate these skills to get the most out of playtime with your child:        PRAISE   – Compliment your child for their positive behaviors. This will reinforce desirable actions, making them more likely to repeat them. Example: “I love how you’re stacking your blocks carefully and keeping them on the table.”      REFLECTION   – Repeat back or reflect what your child talks about during play. This shows that you are listening and value their thoughts. Example: Child says, “The dragon is flying to a far-off land.” Parent reflects, “The dragon is flying to a far-off land.”       IMITATION   – Boost your child’s confidence by copying their creations or ideas. Imitation shows your child you enjoy playing with them and think their ideas are cool. Example: “I’m going to draw a swamp monster just like you.”      DESCRIPTION   – Support your child’s language development and communication skills by describing what you see them doing during play. Example: “I see you’re taking your doll’s sneakers off and putting her roller-skates on.”      ENJOYMENT  – Don’t forget to show enthusiasm and enjoyment as you play. The more fun you are having, the more engaged your child will be. Example: “I am having so much fun playing soccer with you!”    Dr. Marta M. Shinn, a specialist at Variations Psychology, is a    PCIT      and    PC-CARE    Trainer for the University of California, Davis and has taught many moms, dads, and caregivers how to incorporate PRIDE skills in their parenting.     Click here to find a PCIT Provider       


   
     
      
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       Are you a dad? Click here to check out our PRIDE skills for dads     9. Get support   It can be difficult for parents to know how to connect to their inner-kid and engage their children through play. But remember – behind every great player is a supportive coach! Our specialists at Variations can help you bridge the gap between yours and your child’s interests to make play enriching and rewarding for both of you.    Cynthia R. Johnson, LMFT,  is a specialist in Parenting and Child Therapy at Variations Psychology. Cynthia is an experienced PCIT therapist and can teach parents techniques to apply PRIDE skills at home.    Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D.,  is an expert in child and educational psychology. If you are concerned with your child’s development, Dr. Shinn can provide diagnostic testing and educational consulting to meet your child’s needs.     
 
	   Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
       Subscribe to our blog for a weekly article on topics that affect your life         
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams, graduate and professional licensing exams such as MCAT, LSAT, GRE, CBEST, NCLEX, GMAT, CA Cosmetology Exam, CA Contractors State Licensing Exam, and CA Bar Exam).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.         
  
       References:   O’Connor, Siobhan (2017). The Secret Power of Play.  Time Magazine . Retrieved online: http://time.com/4928925/secret-power-play/  Raising Children – The Australian Parenting Website. (2018). Why Play is Important. https://raisingchildren.net.au/newborns/play-learning/play-ideas/why-play-is-important  Bongiorno, L. (2018). 10 Things Every Parent Should Know About Play.  National Association for the Education of Young Children.  https://www.naeyc.org/our-work/families/10-things-every-parent-play  National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2018). Good Toys for Young Children by Age and Stage. Retrieved online: https://www.naeyc.org/resources/topics/play/toys   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). The Parents Guide to Play: 9 Tips to Ignite Your Child’s Learning.    Psychologically Speaking .  [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-parents-guide-to-play-9-tips-to-ignite-your-childs-learning

The Parents Guide to Play: 9 Tips to Ignite Your Child’s Learning

Every parent knows what it feels like to buy your kids new toys, have them play with them for a day, and then have them collect dust for 6 months! While you can’t stop your child from shifting interests, you can make play more engaging to inspire your child to learn and maybe keep that toy off the shelf a little longer. Check out this week’s blog for 9 tips on igniting your child’s learning through play.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    
 
	 Click here to download our 1-page PRIDE of Fatherhood Form 
       The PRIDE of Fatherhood: 5 Ways That Great Dads Shape Our Mental Health   Dads are our first superheroes, and it’s for good reason. Fathers have a unique paternal instinct to protect, care, and provide for their children. In turn, children look up to their fathers as an almost mythical role model, with an inborn drive to make their father proud and live up to his expectations. As Father’s Day approaches, we reflect on the impact that dads have on our lives. We know that their love encourages us and their guidance directs us, but have you ever wondered how a father’s pride impacts the long-term mental health of his children?   The Man, The Myth, The Legend!   Art, literature, and religious texts throughout history have often compared fathers to lions – a fitting comparison due to the sense of strength and power that a father conveys to his children. The English language has often coined groups of animals based on virtues that we associate with them; for example, since owls are associated with wisdom, a group of them is referred to as a “parliament.” Due to their powerful and regal presence, a family of lions is referred to as a “pride.” Much like the lion, a proud father leads his family with purpose and strength and is actively engaged in their growth, security, and well-being.   The Power of a Proud Papa    The love, attention, and interest that a father provides has a life-long influence on the self-esteem, cognitive development, and emotional intelligence of his children. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), a successful treatment to improve emotional and behavioral issues in children, focuses on improving the parent-child relationship and has identified 5 key methods known as PRIDE skills, that parents can use to shape their children’s mental, emotional, and behavioral well-being. Dr. Marta M. Shinn, a specialist at Variations Psychology, is a PCIT trainer for the University of California, Davis and has taught many dads how to incorporate PRIDE skills in their parenting.     
 
	 click here to learn more about dr. shinn 
       Here are the 5 ways that dads can empower their children through PRIDE skills:    P – Praise   As exciting as ice cream, new toys, or an allowance may be, nothing is quite as internally rewarding to a child as being praised by their father for a job well done. Viewing dad as a source of strength and wisdom, praise from dad encourages children to increase good and healthy behaviors as well as reducing dangerous or harmful ones. Dad’s approval increases his child’s self-esteem, teaches them right from wrong, models positive behavior, and makes both dad and his little lion cubs feel great!    Example of using praise: “Son, I love how you are sharing and taking turns with your friends.”     R – Reflection   When dads spend quality time with their children, they can boost their child’s creativity, emotional intelligence, and critical thinking through reflection. Reflection refers to actively listening to their child and repeating back what their child expresses to show them that they are both listened to and understood. By acknowledging their thoughts and validating their emotions, dads teach children how to process their feelings in healthy ways.  Example of using reflection:    Child angrily groans, “I’m mad, this toy isn’t working!”      Dad reflects by calmly saying, “You’re mad because your toy isn’t working. If you use your calm words to ask me for help, then I can show you how to work it.”     I – Imitation   Few people can make a child feel more important than their dad can. When dads aren’t afraid to get silly and imitate their child during play, this makes their kid feel like an absolute rock star. A dad joining his 4-year-old in popping bubble wrap or asking them to teach him their sweet dance move shows their child that dad approves of their playful learning. In turn, imitation also prompts the child to imitate their father more often.      Example of imitation: “I’m going to pretend my spaghetti noodles are worms just like you!”     D – Description   Dads can have a critical impact on their child’s language development, concentration, and focus by using description to point out desirable behaviors. By describing their child’s positive actions, dads reinforce positive behavior, help their child remain focused on completing tasks, increase their vocabulary for desired behaviors, and maintain their child’s interest in what they are doing.    Example of description: “I see that you’re putting your toys away neatly.”     E – Enjoyment   Maintaining a positive, healthy outlook on life is a lot easier when the most important man in your life has been demonstrating how to do that for years. By expressing enjoyment and fun while engaging with children, dads model positive emotions while making their kids feel loved and wanted. These meaningful interactions strengthen the unparalleled bond that is shared between a father and each of his children.    Example of enjoyment: Pats on the back, laughing, clapping, saying, “I just love spending time with you. ”   A father’s pride places a lasting imprint on his children’s lives, empowering their self-worth and nurturing their mental and emotional growth.   To every proud dad out there working hard to raise great kids, Happy Father’s Day from the specialists at Variations Psychology!   Are you a parent who wants to start using PRIDE skills with your children? Are you therapist who would like to share PRIDE skills with parents or trainees?    Click here to download, save, or print our 1-page PRIDE reference sheet for great tips and examples to use and share!     To find a PCIT provider in your area go to the   UC Davis PCIT provider directory  . Contact   Dr. Marta M. Shinn   if you are an individual or agency that would like to be trained in PCIT.   Variations – All dads welcome!    Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D ., is an expert in child and educational psychology and is a PCIT trainer for UC Davis. If you are a clinician or represent a clinic seeking PCIT training, Dr. Shinn can help. She has 10+ years experience using PCIT to improve parent-child relationships, and has trained several agencies in bringing PCIT into their practice. Dr. Shinn’s experience includes training cohorts of therapists as well as mentoring trainers in how to train therapists within and outside of their agencies.     
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
       Dr. Christopher J. Sample, Psy.D . specializes in supporting men through life’s transitions, including the unique challenges of fatherhood. Dr. Sample is experienced in helping dads cope with issues such as parenting struggles, marriage and relationship issues, work stress, addiction, veteran’s issues, anger, anxiety, depression, and trauma. Dr. Sample provides a comfortable place for men to overcome obstacles and gain the tools for leading successful and fulfilling lives.     
 
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Sample 
       Click here to subscribe to Psychologically Speaking      

 
   
     
      
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment with one of our specialists.    More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism, Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams). See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a   call   and we will guide you.  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   Relationship Enhancement P*R*I*D*E reference sheet. https://pcit.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/27_PRIDEskillsrevised10.111.pdf  PCIT International http://www.pcit.org/   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). The PRIDE of Fatherhood: 5 Ways That Great Dads Shape Our Mental Health    Psychologically Speaking .  [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/the-pride-of-fatherhood-5-ways-that-great-dads-shape-our-mental-health

The PRIDE of Fatherhood: 5 Ways That Great Dads Shape Our Mental Health

Dads are our first superheroes, and it’s for good reason. Fathers have a unique paternal instinct to protect, care, and provide for their children. In turn, children look up to their fathers as an almost mythical role model, with an inborn drive to make their father proud and live up to his expectations. As Father’s Day approaches, we reflect on the impact that dads have on our lives. We know that their love encourages us and their guidance directs us, but have you ever wondered how a father’s pride impacts the long-term mental health of his children?