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      Graduate Student’s Guide to Test Accommodations: The LSAT, MCAT, GRE, NCLEX, CBEST, GMAT, Cosmetology Exam, Contractors Exam, & Bar Exam   If you’re facing a high stakes test at the graduate or post-graduate level, you’re no stranger to overcoming challenges. You’ve worked your tail off to get to where you are and know that no obstacle can stop you from reaching your goals. However, if you have a health condition or learning disability that impacts your testing performance, you may be concerned that you won’t be able to show your true knowledge on exam day. Luckily, there are several accommodations available to level the playing field for eligible students.    So what does a person need to do receive accommodations on graduate exams?    1. Know your rights   You may think that because you are taking exams for a high-level career, that you may not be eligible for the same accommodations afforded to high school students. The Americans with Disabilities Act, however, states that students with disabilities who graduate from professional programs are entitled to reasonable accommodations in the licensing process.    2. Stay ahead of deadlines   If you anticipate that you’ll need testing accommodations, don’t wait until the last minute to look into it. The approval process for accommodations takes a minimum of 6 weeks, and that does not include the time it will take for you to gather the documentation required to submit your request. Stay ahead of the game by preparing your request well in advance of registration deadlines. Check out these links to view upcoming deadlines of some common high stakes tests at the graduate or post graduate level:      LSAT     (Nationwide testing calendar)      MCAT     (Nationwide testing calendar)      GRE     (Nationwide testing calendar)      NCLEX   (Appointment – based)      GMAT   (Appointment – based)      California Cosmetology Exam   (Test date is assigned within 40 days of receiving admission letter after submitting this linked application)      CBEST     (California testing calendar)      California Bar Exam     (California testing calendar)      California Contractors State Licensing Exam    (Test date is assigned)     3. Learn how to register   If you are requesting accommodations, you will likely need to register for your exam prior to submitting your request. Check out these links for step-by-step registration instructions for applicants requesting accommodations on these high stakes tests:      LSAT        MCAT        GRE        NCLEX         GMAT         CBEST         California Cosmetology Exam        California Bar Exam        California Contractors State Licensing Exam       4. Learn what’s available   There are a variety of accommodations offered for eligible students. The types of accommodations available depend on the specific testing demands of each exam. Some common accommodations include, but are not limited to:    Additional time to complete exams    Extra breaks    Large print or Braille exam books    Use of computers for writing portions     Private or small group testing    Dictation to a typist or recording device    Wheelchair access    Scratch paper    Use of a scribe    Ability to pace or take walks     Use of magnification devices    Ability to bring medications and/or food and drinks    Voice recognition software     5. Learn what’s not   To approve accommodations, all exam administrators require that your impairment must clearly impact your test-taking ability in some way. Some disabilities that are not commonly accepted are impairments in walking or other physical movement unrelated to writing. Certain psychiatric conditions that do not clearly impair test-taking ability, such as a phobia of spiders, may not be eligible for accommodated testing.   6. Think back to other exams   Some exam providers, such as the LSAT, will often approve any accommodations that you were provided during other exams such as the SAT or ACT. If you received accommodations on any post-secondary exams, contact your previous test administrator and request a letter that details the specific accommodations that you were provided. Keep in mind, however, that you may need additional documentation beyond your past accommodations. Other test administrators, such as the MCAT, have much stricter documentation requirements than the SAT or ACT.   7. Find an expert   While each test administrator has varying policies on what they require, they all share common ground in this: your disability or health condition must be documented by a qualified specialist. From your academic experience, you may have a thorough grasp on your challenges and what accommodations you need to succeed, but you will still need them validated by an expert to receive approval from your test administrator.      


   
     
      
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      8. Get documentation   It’s important to review the specific documentation requirements of your test administrator, as incomplete documentation packets will either be denied or returned as incomplete. A   Specialist in Educational Psychology   can help you prepare your documentation packet. Most test administrators will require certified documentation explaining the following:    Your diagnosis and specific impairments    A description of the evaluative measures used to determine your diagnosis    An explanation of how your impairments limit your functioning during tests    Recommended accommodations with a rationale for each recommendation      Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Marta M. Shinn for evaluation and documentation support     9. Apply early   Once you’ve compiled all of your necessary documentation, apply well in advance of your exam’s deadlines. This will not only give ample time for the application to be reviewed, but will also allow you some time to appeal the decision if your request is denied or returned for having incomplete documentation.    10. Get support   Being faced with a high stakes exam is stressful enough, and worrying about securing your accommodations can prevent you from focusing on mastering your material. Our specialists at Variations Psychology can guide you through the accommodations process, provide you with necessary documentation required for your exam, and help you secure your accommodation needs.     Dr. Marta M. Shinn, Ph.D.,  is an expert in educational psychology. Dr. Shinn can evaluate for impairments or learning disabilities that impact your test taking ability and provide you with necessary documentation and support to secure exam accommodations.      
	 Click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Shinn 
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams, graduate and professional licensing exams such as MCAT, LSAT, GRE, CBEST, NCLEX, GMAT, CA Cosmetology Exam, CA Contractors State Licensing Exam, and CA Bar Exam).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:   Association of American Medical Colleges (2018). Applying for Accommodations. Retrieved online: https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/article/applying-accommodations/  Association of American Medical Colleges (2018). Understanding the Review Process. Retrieved online: https://aamc-orange.global.ssl.fastly.net/production/media/filer_public/18/90/189077ca-f0d0-4c26-ac41-1bf72c1e8248/understanding_the_review_process.pdf  Association of American Medical Colleges (2018). U.S. MCAT Calendar, Scheduling Deadlines, and Score Release Dates. Retrieved online:  https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/article/mcat-testing-calendar-score-release-dates/  California Educator Credentialing Assessments (2018) CBEST PBT Registration Deadlines. Retrieved online: https://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/Content/HTML_FRAG/CAPBTRB_RegistrationDates_CBEST.html  Contractors State License Board (2018). Step 2: Applying for the Examination. http://www.cslb.ca.gov/Contractors/Applicants/Contractors_License/Exam_Application/Applying_For_License.aspx  Cosmetology-License.com (2018). How to Become a Cosmetologist in California. https://www.cosmetology-license.com/california/#complete-examination-application  Department of Consumer Affairs: Board of Barbering and Cosmetology (2018). Cosmetologist Application for Examination and Initial License Fee. Retrieved online:   https://www.barbercosmo.ca.gov/forms_pubs/forms/cosmetologist_app.pdf  Educational Testing Service (2018). Accommodations for Test Takers with Disabilities or Health-related Needs. Retrieved online: https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/register/disabilities/  Educational Testing Service (2018). How to Request Accommodations. Retrieved online: https://www.ets.org/disabilities/test_takers/request_accommodations/  Educational Testing Service (2018). Test Centers and Dates. Retrieved online: https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/register/centers_dates/  Graduate Management Admission Council (2018). Four Steps to Schedule Your GMAT Exam. Retrieved online:https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/before-the-exam/register-for-the-gmat-exam/schedule-your-exam  Graduate Management Admission Council (2018). Register as a Test Taker with Disabilities. Retrieved online: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/before-the-exam/register-for-the-gmat-exam/register-as-a-test-taker-with-disabilities  Law School Administration Council (2018). LSAC Policy on Accommodations for Test Takers with Disabilities. Retrieved online: https://www.lsac.org/lsat/lsac-policy-accommodations-test-takers-disabilities  Law School Administration Council (2018). LSAC Deadlines and Score Release Dates. Retrieved online: https://www.lsac.org/lsat/lsat-dates-deadlines-score-release-dates  National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2018). Application and Registration. Retrieved online: https://www.ncsbn.org/nclex-application-and-registration.htm  National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2018). Scheduling. Retrieved online: https://www.ncsbn.org/1217.htm  Study.com (2018) NCLEX Test Accommodations. Retrieved online: https://study.com/academy/popular/nclex-test-accommodations.html  Study.com (2018) CBEST Test Accommodations. Retrieved online: https://study.com/academy/popular/cbest-test-accommodations.html  The State Bar of California (2018). General Instructions for Requesting Test Accommodations. Retrieved online: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Portals/0/documents/forms/admissions/TAInstructions.0416_R.pdf  U.S. Department of Justice (2018). ADA Requirements – Testing Accommodations. Retrieved online: https://www.ada.gov/regs2014/testing_accommodations.html   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). Graduate Student’s Guide to Test Accommodations: The LSAT, MCAT, GRE, NCLEX,   CBEST, GMAT, Cosmetology Exam, Contractors Exam, & Bar Exam.   Psychologically Speaking .   [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/graduate-students-guide-to-test-accommodations

Graduate Student’s Guide to Test Accommodations: The LSAT, MCAT, GRE, NCLEX, CBEST, GMAT, Cosmetology Exam, Contractors Exam, & Bar Exam

The Americans with Disabilities Act ensures that adults with disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations on professional licensing exams. However, the application and approval process can be confusing and time consuming. If you are facing a high stakes exam, check out this week’s blog to learn tips on successfully securing accommodations.

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Cutting & Other Self-Harm: What Every Parent Needs to Know    Every parent’s worst nightmare is their child being hurt. From baby gates to GPS tracking apps, parents spend lots of time and money on making sure their kids are safe. But what about when their child is the one inflicting the pain? When a child deliberately injures their body without the intention of dying, it is called Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Shockingly, NSSI is a growing problem that usually starts in children between the ages of 12 & 14. Teens who resort to NSSI have trouble expressing their emotions in healthy ways. So how can parents reach these kids and help them find safer ways to cope?   If you suspect your child may be at risk for NSSI, here are some things you should know:    1. Clothes can be clues   Common methods of NSSI include skin cutting, scratching, burning, and self-battery, all of which usually leave visible wounds or bruises. If you notice your child wearing sweatshirts in the summer heat, excessive bandages, or chunky wristbands every day, it could be a clue that they are covering up self-injury. Another indication is if they avoid activities that expose much skin such as swimming.      2. It’s not the same as suicide   Any parent would be rightfully scared if their child injured themselves in any way, but it’s important to understand that a child using NSSI does not mean that they want to die. When people want to end their life, they often seek out the most painless way possible. Those who use NSSI on the other hand, often seek pain to distract from their emotional distress, but do so believing that their injuries are not life-threatening. Though it should come as some relief that teens using NSSI usually don’t want to die, professional help should be sought for any type of self-harm. Accidental suicide can result from NSSI and in some cases people who use NSSI have a history of suicide attempts.  If you are concerned that someone you love may be at risk for suicide, call    the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255      3. They cut for a reason   Psychologists know that all behaviors have a function – meaning no matter what a person does, there is something they feel that they are benefitting from it. So what do teens who use NSSI feel that they are getting out of hurting themselves? The Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders states that people usually resort to NSSI for one or more of the following 3 reasons:       To   obtain relief     from a negative feeling or cognitive state e.g. stress, worry thoughts, loneliness, emptiness    To   resolve     interpersonal conflict e.g family arguments, divorce, sibling rivalry, peer conflict    To   induce     a positive feeling state e.g euphoria, decrease numbness     Their feelings of relief occur during or shortly after the act of self-injury. Understanding why your child is resorting to NSSI can help in guiding you toward the solution.     4. It can be a symptom of other disorders   NSSI can be a stand-alone problem, but it can also be a symptom of other disorders. Conditions that NSSI has been associated with include borderline personality disorder, eating disorders, substance abuse, depression, bipolar disorders, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. If a teen shows self-harming behavior, it’s important that they be evaluated by a specialist to determine if they have a mental health diagnosis and need treatment.    Click here to schedule your child’s diagnostic assessment with Dr. Marta M. Shinn, specialist in Child Psychology     5. Criticism will backfire   Trying to guilt or criticize a child out of self-harm won’t work. Often times, they are hurting themselves because of feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem. You don’t have to coddle them or let them get away with everything, but try to focus most of your comments on  praising their talents and positive traits.      6. How you respond matters   It’s common for a parent to feel shock, sadness, or fear when they learn their child is harming themselves. Try not to let those emotions show, as that will make your child hesitant to openly talk to you about what they’re dealing with. Ask them how their self-harm has helped them (refer back to the functions of NSSI in point #3). Listen with love and respond without judgement. Let them know that you are there for them, but also let them know if you plan to seek the help of a specialist.     7. Emotional intelligence is key   While you can’t prevent your child from dealing with hardships in life, you do have the power to teach them how to cope with challenges in healthy ways. Emotional intelligence refers to how a person understands and copes with their emotions. Nurturing your child’s emotional intelligence, as well as working on growing your own, can improve communication and healthy expression in your family.     Click here to read our blog on fostering emotional intelligence in your child      8. You are part of the solution   If your child is harming themselves, it’s natural to wonder where you went wrong as a parent. The fact that you are reading this blog shows that you love and care for your child, and you should know that there are many different factors that can contribute to a child resorting to NSSI. A specialist in child psychology will not judge you or your child, but will help identify the challenges your teen is facing, teach your family healthy strategies moving forward, and support you in mending a strong bond.     9. Variations can help   Teen years are tough on both parents and children. Many parents find that they need a little outside help in supporting their teens during these turbulent years. There have been several therapy methods that have successfully reduced self-harming behaviors. If your child or teen has used NSSI, the specialists at Variations Psychology can help.        
	 CLick here to find a specialists that's right for you 
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment  with one of our specialists.   More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams).  See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a call and we will guide you..  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References:     Baetens, I. , Claes, L. , Martin, G. , Onghena, P. , Grietens, H. , et al. (2014). Is nonsuicidal self-injury associated with parenting and family factors?. Journal of Early Adolescence, 34(3), 387-405.  Bentley, K. , Cassiello-Robbins, C. , Vittorio, L. , Sauer-Zavala, S. , & Barlow, D. (2015). Theassociation between nonsuicidal self-injury and the emotional disorders: A meta-analytic review.Clinical Psychology Review, 37, 72-88.  Bresin, K. , & Schoenleber, M. (2015). Gender differences in the prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 38, 55-64.  Chesin, Megan & N. Moster, Aviva & Jeglic, Elizabeth. (2013). Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Among Ethnically and Racially Diverse Emerging Adults: Do Factors Unique to the Minority Experience Matter?. Current Psychology. 32. 10.1007/s12144-013-9185-2.  Dahlström, Ö. , Zetterqvist, M. , Lundh, L. , Svedin, C. , & Reynolds, C. (2015). Functions of nonsuicidal self-injury: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in a large community sample of adolescents. Psychological Assessment, 27(1), 302-313.  Kuentzel, J. G., Arble, E. , Boutros, N. , Chugani, D. and Barnett, D. (2012), Nonsuicidal Self‐Injury in an Ethnically Diverse College Sample. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 82: 291-297. doi:  10.1111/j.1939-0025.2012.01167.x    Lüdtke, J. , In-Albon, T. , Michel, C. , & Schmid, M. (2016). Predictors for dsm-5 nonsuicidal self-injury in female adolescent inpatients: The role of childhood maltreatment, alexithymia, and dissociation. Psychiatry Research, 239, 346-352.  Willoughby, T. , Heffer, T. , & Hamza, C. (2015). The link between nonsuicidal self-injury and acquired capability for suicide: A longitudinal study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, .  Whitlock, J., Exner-Cortens, D. , Purington, A. , & Reynolds, C. (2014). Assessment of nonsuicidal self-injury: Development and initial validation of the non-suicidal self-injury–assessment tool (nssi-at). Psychological Assessment, 26(3), 935-946.  Wilkinson, P. (2013). Non-suicidal self-injury. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 22(Supplement 1), 75-79.  You, J. , Lin, M. , & Leung, F. (2015). A longitudinal moderated mediation model of nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 43(2), 381-390.  You, J. , Zheng, C. , Lin, M. , & Leung, F. (2016). Peer group impulsivity moderated the individual-level relationship between depressive symptoms and adolescent nonsuicidal self injury. Journal of Adolescence, 47, 90-99.  Young, C. , Simonton, A. , Key, S. , Barczyk, A. , & Lawson, K. (2016). Closing in on crisis: Informing clinical practice regarding nonsuicidal self-injury in youth. Journal of Pediatric Health Care   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). Cutting & Other Self-Harm: What Every Parent Needs to Know.    Psychologically Speaking . [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/cutting-other-self-harm-what-every-parent-needs-to-know

Cutting & Other Self-Harm:
What Every Parent Needs to Know

Every parent’s biggest fear is their child getting hurt, but what’s a parent to do when their child is hurting themselves? Check out this week’s blog on Your Teen and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: What Every Parent Needs to Know

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Operation Anger Man-agement! A Guy’s Guide to Understanding His Inner Hulk    She did it. She freaking did it. After screaming at your wife 10 times about leaving the kitchen light on overnight, she did it again. Beneath the surface you know it’s not really such a big deal, but it doesn’t matter – you storm into the bedroom, waking her up in an uncontrollable rage. Screams barrel out of you faster than you can process them. You love her, and you know in 20 minutes you’re going to hate yourself for acting this way, so why can’t you stop?   The age of rage   It might surprise some to learn that research hasn’t found any innate differences in aggression between boys and girls, yet anger issues are much higher in adult men than women. This has a lot to do with how we socialize boys differently than girls from a young age. In general, girls are encouraged to express emotions through crying, pouting, or expressing sadness. Boys on the other hand, may be conditioned to repress them, often ending in emotions boiling up until they overflow with anger. For example, if a group of kids are playing outside and a girl skins her knee, her parents may react by consoling her, whereas a boy in the same situation may be told to “suck it up,” and to “stop crying.”   Everyone gets mad, so what?   The occasional outburst is natural, healthy even. Anger is used as a shield; when we feel threatened, the sensory areas of our brain trigger our fight-or-flight response and we can react with anger as it provides a sense of protection. Boys are taught from a young age that anger is masculine and reflects toughness and strength. In reality, anger may be more of a reflection of a man’s feelings of inadequacy or powerlessness and can be their method to feel in control. When this becomes a man’s go-to coping strategy, anger goes beyond healthy venting and can damage several areas of his life.   It’s not me, it’s you   After a job loss or breakup, men may convince themselves that once their jerk boss or nagging girlfriend is out of the picture, their anger issues will go away. But it’s only a matter of time before old habits start to surface with new people in their life, showing that a changed environment doesn’t change the brain. The truth is, even the world’s most annoying people don’t make a man angry; it is the way his brain perceives their words and actions that make him enraged.   The dangers of defense-mode   For a man whose main tool is anger, insignificant issues may start to appear as major threats. He’ll start to scan his environment, wait for something to pick up on his radar, and use it to displace his rage. Things like a waiter explaining that the cafe is out of waffles can make him react like Chuck Norris facing a legion of terrorists. A University of Chicago study found that men with anger issues perceived faces with neutral expressions as aggressive; they felt under attack even when they weren’t, and their bodies responded accordingly. This constant “defense-mode” makes everyday interactions targets for outbursts of rage. Sometimes these outbursts are expressed outward toward other people, other times they are experienced inward toward oneself.   Doing the “temper tip-toe”   For the chronically angry man, friends and family start to feel like they’re walking on eggshells when they’re around them. They fear that even small offenses like forgetting to fold the laundry will result in a massive blow-up, and having to fearfully tip-toe around his temper becomes emotionally exhausting. Without learning how to change his perceptions and reactions, anger can poison his relationships, career, and health, not to mention putting him at risk for harming himself or others.   Get help or get out!   Many men are reluctant to get help for their anger and only come to therapy because of an ultimatum given by a family member, employer, or law enforcement. They feel defensive and resentful for being there; from their perspective, the problem is not their anger, but rather the problem of others in their life or society as a whole. Their anger may have served as a cover for facing their feelings of shame or inadequacy, so the last thing they want to do is expose what they’ve been hiding with their rage, if they’re even aware of it.   Hands off my hammer!   It’s understandable that a man with anger issues would be resistant to getting help. In most cases, anger has been a way of living that has been ingrained in them from childhood. It may be their main tool for dealing with their emotions, and it has helped them feel safe against situations they perceived as threatening to their ego. When your only weapon is a hammer, you don’t want anyone taking it from you. Unless, they had something better to replace it with…   Where there’s a will, there’s a way     If you’re a man dealing with anger issues, try these tips to get a handle on your anger:    1. Breath like a boss   Chances are you’ve got Olympic skills in screaming, fist clenching, or arguing. An area you may need to work on – your breathing. When you get angry, your muscles tighten up and your breathing becomes shorter, both of which increase your irritability. When you start feeling heated, focus on taking deep breaths with slow exhales.     2. Become a neuro-ninja   Your brain has become predisposed to anger because of a little thing called “neuroplasticity.” Neuroplasticity is your brains ability to adapt to its environment and create patterns of thinking (neuropathways) based on your life experiences. If you have anger issues, you’ve carved paths for your thoughts that lead to feeling threatened, attacked, and angry. The good news is, neuroplasticity works both ways, and you can condition your brain to adopt healthier ways of thinking. When you feel angry thoughts coming on, challenge them. Become a neuro-ninja by slicing up thoughts that make you feel threatened. Dissect them, question them, and try to think of other thoughts that may reduce your anger.   3. Practice makes peaceful   Reversing a lifetime of brain wiring doesn’t happen overnight. Focus on progress, not perfection. A good way to practice is by rehearsing different reactions to triggering situations and getting to know your angry side. Think of a previous situation where you blew up. Replay the situation in your mind and figure out the exact point where you flew off the handle. What were you thinking in that moment in time? Was it true or false? Was your anger justified? Each time you replay the situation, try thinking of healthier ways you could have responded. The next time you feel triggered to fly off the handle, thinking of your rehearsals can help you choose a better reaction.   4. Time is your ally   One of the best things you can do when you are feeling enraged is to simply wait. You can scream just as loudly at your annoying co-worker tomorrow, but by waiting one day, you can enter the situation with a clearer head and determine if hostility is really the most effective way to address the situation. Many men find it helpful to take a minute or two to write down their thoughts, covering areas such as what they would want to say to the person that upset them, or jotting down some reasons the person may have done what bothered them. They can also talk to a friend to allow them to vent their anger instead of directing it to the person they are upset with. Taking time to reflect, vent, and write can help you process your thoughts and feelings in a healthy way.   5. Get to know your angry side   Be mindful of what triggers your anger – is it being behind slow drivers? Drinking tequila? Engaging in political debates on Facebook? Pay attention to the situations that seem to shorten your fuse, and when it’s reasonable, try to avoid what triggers you. If your trigger is something you can’t avoid, such as being around a loved one, take breaks or walk away when you start to feel heated.   6. Get a trainer for your mental fitness   Coming to grips that you may have anger issues and seeking support for it can be difficult on many levels. If your anger has affected your life to a significant degree, then having some professional support may aid you to not only understand your anger, but to decrease it to a manageable level.  It’s important for men to overcome obstacles and gain the tool set and adopt a more empowering perspective on life      
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              The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlighted topic. For a full consultation, assessment, and personalized treatment plan, schedule an appointment with one of our specialists.      More about Variations Psychology   Variations Psychology is a group practice specializing in Child and Family Psychology.  Our specialists provide therapy to infants, children, adolescents, and adults to help them overcome the many challenges they may face throughout the lifespan of a family. We also conduct diagnostic testing of child and adult conditions that may impact the family’s mental health and development (e.g. ADHD, Autism, Depression, Anxiety, Learning Disorders, college entrance exams). See our   Specialists   page to select the specialist that best suits your need, or simply give us a   call   and we will guide you.  Variations Psychology is located in Newport Beach, CA and provides counseling to residents throughout Orange County and its surrounding areas including Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Irvine, Shady Canyon, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Coto de Caza, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Yorba Linda, Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Pelican Hill, Crystal Cove, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, Lake Forest, Huntington Beach, Sunset Beach, Seal Beach, and more.      
  
       References :    Jaquet, G. (2013). 5 Steps to Manage Anger Like a Man.  The Good Men Project.  Retrieved online: https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/cc-5-steps-to-manage-anger-like-a-man/  Potter-Effron, R. (2012) The Angry Brain: How to Control Men with Uncontrollable Tempers.  Alternet.org . Retrieved online: https://www.alternet.org/personal-health/angry-brain-how-help-men-uncontrollable-tempers  Stosny, S. (2010).  Psychology Toda y. Retrieved online: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/anger-in-the-age-entitlement/201004/anger-men-and-love  Smith, K. (2018). What Causes Anger Issues in Men.  Guy Stuff Counseling and Coaching . Retrieved online: https://www.guystuffcounseling.com/counseling-men-blog/bid/87269/what-causes-anger-issues-in-men  The Meadows (2016). Men and the Illusion of Anger. Retrieved online: https://www.themeadows.com/blog/item/785-men-and-the-illusion-of-anger  Trivedi, Madhukar (2004) The Link Between Depression and Physical Symptoms,  The    Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , Vol 6., pp. 12-16  Young Men’s Health (2017). Anger Management. Retrieved online: https://youngmenshealthsite.org/guides/anger-management/   How to Cite This Blog Article:   Shinn, M.M. (2018). Operation Anger Man-agement! A Guy’s Guide to Understanding His Inner Hulk.    Psychologically Speaking . [Variations Psychology blog post].  Retrieved from https://www.variationspsychology.com/blogs/operation-anger-man-agement

Operation Anger Man-agement!
A Guy’s Guide to Understanding His Inner Hulk

She did it. She freaking did it. After screaming at your wife 10 times about leaving the kitchen light on overnight, she did it again. Beneath the surface you know it’s not really such a big deal, but it doesn’t matter – you storm into the bedroom, waking her up in an uncontrollable rage. Screams barrel out of you faster than you can process them. You love her, and you know in 20 minutes you’re going to hate yourself for acting this way, so why can’t you stop?